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Kimberly Blessing

Web Developer Job Search: Your Resume

6 min read

I estimate that I have spent a full work-week, over the course of my career, reviewing web developer resumes. That's enough time to produce some strong opinions on the topic. Allow me to finally continue the Job Search thread by sharing my advice for creating a top-notch web developer resume.

Resume Format and Structure

Your resume format should work to highlight your strengths. The chronological resume, perhaps the most traditional format, fails in this regard. A functional resume does a much better job of highlighting your experience in a specific role, but most web developers are good at more than one thing. I suggest mixing aspects of the two formats, organizing them in a way that makes sense for you and your strengths -- then you'll have a resume that stands out.

Here are the general sections found in a great web developer resume. With the exception of the first two, the rest can be ordered and/or further broken out according to your needs.

  • Objective: If you're searching for a job, you ought to know what you're seeking! Customize your objective, as needed, when replying to job postings. (Note: If you're not actively seeking a job, but still want to have a resume posted online, it's okay to omit this section.)
  • Summary of Qualifications: It's a cheesy headline, perhaps, and all too often the summary is filled with buzzwords -- but I have read really compelling summaries that made me want to know more about a candidate. Focus on describing your strengths and what you contribute to an organization.
  • Skills: This is where the keywords and buzzwords will start showing up. That's okay: you'll back them up with evidence in the other sections. You can subdivide this section in any number of ways: Technical vs. Soft Skills, Front-End vs. Back-End Skills, Design vs. Development Skills, etc.
  • Professional Accomplishments: Here you can include project accomplishments, awards, public speaking engagements, publishing credits, or descriptions of really awesome things you've accomplished. Like the Skills section, you can also break these out separately.
  • Work Experience: If you've done any combination of full-time work, freelancing, and volunteering, this is the most generic title you can use for your work history. Some people like to break out their professional experience from other work, but I think that can undermine the importance of having taken on freelance or volunteer work. If you list accomplishments for each job in this section, don't repeat them elsewhere, and vice versa.
  • Education: I don't like to see this section missing from a resume. Haven't gone to college? That's okay. Be proud of what schooling you have made it through and list it here. Oh, and that includes training programs, conferences -- anything you've forked out money for that you've learned something from!

Required Information

If your resume were to consist of only two things, it should be these:

  • Contact Information: You'd think this would be a no-brainer, but I have seen resumes where developers didn't list a phone number, email address, or personal web site (more on that below). In my opinion, it's a waste of space to display your full home address, especially if you are looking to relocate. No one's going to snail-mail you an invitation to interview, so city and state will suffice. HR will collect the rest of your contact information later.
  • URLs: I wish I could tell you exactly how many of those ~500 resumes didn't include a single URL... but my gut says that at least half didn't feature even a personal web site URL. Seriously? If you're a web developer, you should have some URLs to share. If you're brand-new to the field, put some of your school projects online. If you've only ever done intranet-type work, get permission to copy parts of the code and make it available, or create other projects of your own to demonstrate your skills. If you're serious about getting a web development job, you need this.

On the flip side, don't waste space on these bits of information: references (or the phrase, "References available upon request"), GPA, salary requirements, or personal information (except if you have hobbies that would be of interest to another geek and would increase the likelihood of getting invited in for an interview).

Frequently Asked Questions

Does my resume have to fit on to one or two pages? No, I don't think that it does. However, I think it's nice if a resume is so well edited and structured that, when printed, it fits to exactly one or two pages (one page if you're young, recently out of school, or switching careers; otherwise two pages). However, if you truly have so much awesomeness to report, then, by all means, go on! If you're really that super-duper, I'm sure I'll want to know all about it.

Does one resume fit all jobs? NO! Don't be afraid to tweak your resume format or content to the job you're applying for. In fact, if you have diverse enough skills and interests (design vs. development) you should probably have completely separate resumes for these purposes.

I am graduating soon and don't have much web development experience. What can I do to beef-up my resume? Use the "Objective" area to make it clear that you're looking for an entry-level position. Highlight your strengths in the "Summary of Qualifications" area and place the "Education" section next, so it's clear you're just coming out of school. List your technical skills, as well as any soft skills that you can support with extra-curricular or volunteer work. If you have been active in a tech community or have attended technical or web conferences, list those.

I'm switching careers. I've taken some web design and development courses and done some small projects. How do I reflect all of this in my resume? First, don't hide the fact that you're switching careers! Your prior experience, even if in a completely different industry, has (hopefully) taught you how to deal with people and has helped you understand your strengths. Start your resume with an "Objective" statement that spells out your desire to move into web development. Then list your skills, training and experience with the web so far before providing your employment history and other educational details. Highlight any experience that translates across industries, but otherwise keep the non-web details short.


I hope the above helps you create an awesome resume. Remember, your resume (supported with at least one awesome URL) helps get you in the door for an interview, so take some time to craft one that truly reflects you!

If you have questions I haven't addressed above, I'm happy to accept them in the comments below.

Kimberly Blessing

Pausing for a new year reflection

3 min read

Reflection, by Kimberly Blessing

Since my last real post here, over four months ago, I've been asked countless times why I don't blog more. I've received numerous emails from people who've thanked me for the advice I've offered here, and I can tell from the stats that people are still visiting. Don't worry -- I haven't given up on the blog, and I get that you're still interested in what I have to say. To which I can only say, thank you! I will get back to posting soon. But let me update you on some changes in my world.

Last month I transitioned into a new role at CIM: that of senior software architect, focused on web front-end engineering. It's exciting and it's scary, as any change is. I've put a lot of time and effort into developing my management and leadership skills and changing some bad behaviors, but I don't think any of that will go to waste in this new role. One becomes a software architect, in part, because of one's leadership skills, and having experienced managing some of the people I'll continue to work with only gives me greater insight into their talents and strengths, so I can help them accomplish more. From a technical skills perspective, while I've kept up on HTML, CSS, and browsers, there are a whole host of languages and technologies I need to brush up on or get acquainted with. I don't need to be the expert on everything, but I do need to hold my own in conversations with Java programmers, system administrators, and even other front-end developers. Most importantly, though, I need to buckle down and write more, so that my thoughts, research, ideas, and questions are available both to myself and others. As you, dear reader, can probably tell, sitting down and making myself write out my thoughts is not one of my strengths!

I will also be busy these next few months teaching a web application design and development class at Bryn Mawr College. I first had the opportunity to teach this "recent topics" computer science class at the end of 2008, and it was popular enough that the students asked the department chair to bring me back! I'm honored that every space in the class is full, and I hope to challenge both the students and myself by looking more into creating single web experiences which adapt nicely to the mobile environment. I am still thinking about whether I will re-present or make available the course materials to a broader audience, online.

I'm also preparing to present at some conferences this year and I'm working on a few other projects. I joked, on Twitter, that my theme word for 2011 should be "over-committed" and that's definitely true. So the mantra I'm repeating to myself is one I recently got in a fortune cookie:

You cannot be anything if you want to be everything.

A good reminder to all of us. Happy new year!

Kimberly Blessing

Working On Weaknesses

4 min read

Say NO to kryptonite t-shirt Even Superman has a weakness. (One of mine is wanting to own lots of cool t-shirts, like this one.)

In my last post, Understand and Leverage Your Strengths, I wrote about focusing on your strengths to make yourself (and your team) happier and more successful.

But a former direct report of mine wrote to remind me that, even when one understands and leverages his or her strengths, it's still possible to have a weakness or skill deficit that makes true success difficult to attain. What does one do in this type of situation? If this is something that's weighing greatly on you, here's my advice.

First, get specific about the weakness. Don't just summarize it as, for example, "I'm not a good communicator." What is it that you're not good at or comfortable with? Is it that your written communications lack structure or suffer due to poor spelling and grammar? Are you terrified of speaking before a crowd and thus get tongue-tied whenever you must do so? You want have a focused statement that spells out what you're addressing; for a bit of positive reinforcement, you might even specify what related skill you have that you're good at. Using the earlier example, you might be able to make the following statement: "While I am able to clearly summarize and deliver my thoughts verbally to one person or a few people in a regular team meeting, I get very nervous about speaking before larger groups or people I don't know well, to the point where my delivery of prepared statements can be very awkward."

Next, determine how much you need to grow to be successful -- and this means getting specific about what success means to you. Let's say that you're a web designer and you want to start doing some consulting work where you deliver design and front-end code for clients. You are already a decent HTML and CSS coder, so you have that covered, but you don't know any JavaScript and anticipate having to write some every so often. Rather than give up on your consulting business idea because you think it will be too hard to learn JavaScript, you may want to think about finding someone you could outsource that work to. Or you can work with some developer friends to create a small suite of scripts that you rely on. Or maybe you really should buckle down and try to learn JavaScript before you assume that you can't!

Once you've figured out the above you can create a development plan. Take out a sheet of paper. On the left, write down where you are today; on the right, write down where you want to be. Then identify the steps you need to take to get from one to the other and write those out in between. Assign some dates to each step, et voilĂ , you've got yourself a plan!

Does that sound too easy? It might, especially if the idea of addressing this weakness fills you with dread or fear. To that end, I strongly suggest that you seek feedback throughout this entire process. You may be surprised to learn that others don't view your weakness the same way you do -- this can be a really great perspective to consider. By talking about your weakness, you may come to terms with it. Or, you may be able to identify someone who could mentor you as you work through your development plan.

So, what's your weakness? Leave a comment and you just might find someone who can help you as you help yourself!

Kimberly Blessing

Understand and Leverage Your Strengths

4 min read

I like to know things about myself. Don't you? I've taken personality tests and behavioral assessments to be more self-aware, to learn what I should focus on in my personal development efforts, and to better understand how I related to and communicate with other people. OK, and for fun. You've probably done the same, right?

Me with my StrengthsFinder book My strengths are: Command, Deliberative, Significance, Strategic, and Learner.

My favorite self-assessment is one that many people don't know about: StrengthsFinder 2.0. StrengthsFinder is both a book and a test: the book includes an introduction to StrengthsFinder, a code for accessing an online assessment tool, and an explanation of the 34 strengths (or "themes"). The assessment results in a customized report which will help you understand your strengths and how you can use them to be more effective in both your work and your personal life.

Personally, StrengthsFinder has really helped me embrace my strengths. For example, I used to think of myself as "bossy" (because that's how people described me) and I looked for ways of toning down this "weakness". But learning that my number one strength was Command made me feel different -- it helped me understand that being the boss is a natural position for me and that people look to me to lead them. It made me realize that having formal management and leadership responsibilities would make me a happier, more productive person, rather than a cranky and bossy individual contributor.

You may already see why, as a manager, I love StrengthsFinder. We can't all verbalize what we're good at or what kind of work we love to do. For a while, I've asked everyone on my teams to take the test and share their results with me. Once I know what strengths a person has, I can better leverage their skills to make them -- and the team -- more successful.

For example, in the software development community, most programmers have one of the rational temperaments (ENTJ, INTJ, ENTP, or INTP). But if you manage a team of programmers, you can't just look at them as a a bunch of INTJs (a very common type for programmers, though a very small percentage of the overall population) -- you need to see them as individuals. INTJs are introverts and can be brutally honest, but that doesn't mean that they can't be persuasive communicators to large groups. StrengthsFinder gives me far more specific information about a person than a behavior or personality test can tell me.

StrengthsFinder Team Top 5 Grid

Once a group of people complete their StrengthsFinder assessments, you can chart their results to determine overall group themes. I've done this with three teams of employees at different companies and the results are always enlightening. For example, about half of my present team has the "Adaptability" strength -- this is perfect for our team because our product strategy has shifted around quite a bit in recent months, so we have people who can roll with those changes. We also have about 50% "Input" and "Learner": both are crucial to the way we operate. Where we have only one or two people exhibiting a certain strength, I see how I can use those individuals to encourage the overall team, to ask important questions, or to sustain us when the sh*t hits the fan (a necessary evil).

Strengths Finder 2.0

What are you waiting for? Learn more or buy StrengthsFinder 2.0 now and take the test. Learn about yourself. Share the results with your family and team. Encourage others to take it and share their results. At the very least, it should confirm what you already know about yourself -- but I'll bet you'll learn something new, too.

Have you already taken StrengthsFinder? What are your Top 5? What have you learned about yourself or others?

Kimberly Blessing

Epic Management Fails

6 min read

"who's able here to honestly say 'I have a great boss'?" two hands raised... 320 persons in the room... Via Daniel Glazman on Twitter

Although I always identify myself as a technologist, I've been managing people for a while and that is the primary focus of my full-time work. Managing people is an art, not a science. It's very hard work, and I didn't completely understand this before becoming a manager. Honestly, I don't think most people -- even managers -- understand how hard of a job this can be.

I think that I've become a pretty good manager -- with time and experience, with feedback and mentoring. There were times when I wasn't so great, though. In an attempt at radical honesty (hat tip to Erica O'Grady), here is a list of my epic management fails and what I've learned from them.

  • I tried to keep my hands in the code. Somewhere I once heard that coders who become managers and still try to write code only do so because they're arrogant and they end up sucking at both. While I don't agree 100% with that statement, I can agree that diverting focus from management responsibilities can have a negative impact on people and projects. As a manager I've gotten so deep into code that I've trampled on the responsibilities and goals of my direct reports. I've also made commitments to deliver production-ready code but then been so distracted by management responsibilities that I caused project deadlines to be missed. While attempting to code for production work isn't a good idea for managers, I think that coding for practice -- to keep one's skills in shape or to have experience with what the team is working on -- is definitely a good thing. A technical manager who can coach a team on both a personal and a technical level is a huge asset.
  • I didn't prepare for one-on-one meetings. One of the top priorities of a manager is meeting with direct reports on a regular basis to review expectations, set and track progress of goals, provide feedback, and coach for achievement. If you ignore this responsibility as a manager, you're not doing your job, period.* Over time, I've realized that some managers avoid these meetings because they're not prepared. I've certainly made the mistake of meeting with an individual without having an agenda, or without having deliverables ready. Ever had an awkward review with your boss? Chances are, it was awkward because they weren't prepared. I find that I have to practice difficult conversations before I walk in to a meeting, and I even like to rehearse giving feedback. When I'm nervous about a meeting, I know I'm not prepared. When I realize this, I'll try to reschedule the meeting or, worst case scenario, I'll admit to being unprepared and beg forgiveness.

    However, even if you conduct regular one-on-ones, you can do it very poorly. For example, I've had managers who've spent most of my one-on-one time talking to or emailing other people, just talking the entire time without listening, and even zoning out (staring at the ceiling, a piece of furniture). Other faux-pas include glaring at the person (or eye-rolling, laughing at inappropriate times), only giving negative feedback, never offering assistance, and never asking for feedback.

  • I wanted more (or less or something different) for someone. I'm an overachiever and I've always had a vision for what I could and should be doing in any job. I know that not everyone is this way, yet somehow this fact escaped me early in my management career. Some of my earliest supervisees were just doing a job, with no vision for themselves in the future, so I adopted a style of pushing my own vision for a person's career. I could pat myself on the back for the times in which this worked out, but there were times where this approach certainly backfired -- such as the strong generalist who I thought should specialize in an area they didn't care for, or the developer who I saw moving up the tech ladder when they wanted to move into management. Having a dialog not just about about an individual's current role and goals but also about their future is crucial. I like to do this at least twice a year, now, to ensure that my direct reports and I are on the same page.
  • I hired someone despite having concerns about their ability to do the job. This is a tough one to address in generalities, but I'll try. Any hiring decision should be backed up with evidence gathered through a rigorous interview process. Every new hire presents some level of risk, but you want to have primarily positive feelings about a hiring decision, not concerns. I have, on occasion, made hiring decisions based less on evidence and more on what I thought could be possible, given training, coaching, and mentoring. Sometimes it has worked out wonderfully. Other times it's been a painful experience for both the individual who was hired and for me. I do believe in giving people a chance, though, so I can't totally knock taking these risks. These days I try to be open about expectations prior to hiring and I reinforce those expectations once the individual walks in the door in regular one-on-ones. I don't usually out-and-out express my concerns, though -- this can kill a person's confidence! But if I must, I'll also express my support for the person and assume responsibility for making sure the right things are in place for the person to be successful.
  • I let my own issues get in the way of my responsibilities. Anyone who's followed me on Twitter for the past year has seen this one first hand. I started a new job last January and spent almost the entire year unhappy with my role, the work, and number of other things. I focused on the frustration, vented publicly, and let public response further fuel my discontent. All of this distraction consumed me; meanwhile my team languished. I began planning an exit strategy and engaged an awesome career coach who ended up reminding me of my strengths and reignited my passion for creating positive change. I set to work on creating a plan to address not only what was making me unhappy but also what I felt was missing from making our organization a powerhouse. I'm now executing on that plan and seeing small successes, which I hope to grow into larger successes this year.

Do you recognize any of these epic fails, either personally or in a manager you've worked with? Does your organization have a strong culture of coaching and mentoring managers to prevent against these and other fails? Share your story below for others to learn from. I'll share my epic wins later!

Kimberly Blessing

Owning It and Appreciating It

2 min read

I am a geek, a computer nerd, a technologist, a computer scientist. Since a young age, I've been good at tinkering with mechanical and electrical things. I always loved math and computers, writing programs, playing games, and helping people achieve their goals through the use of technology.

I was good at other things too, and when people discouraged me from pursuing my interests in math, science, and technology, I focused on those other things. But, thanks to a liberal arts education (in which I realized my true strengths) and good people who helped reignite my interest in computers, I eventually came back to technology, and have made a career of my passion.

In 2003, just 29 percent of Computer Scientists were female. As Katha Pollitt (and many other feminists) would have me say, my presence here is a victory for the women's movement!

I will not be scared away by statistics of dwindling numbers of women in the field, or by sluggish job prospects. I will not be intimidated by men in the field, nor will I be swayed by "opt-out feminists" who would want me to believe that my true calling is in the home by my husband's side. Many women have gone before me, and I will seek to include more young girls and women in the field, and to support them as they traverse this rough and bumpy road.