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Kimberly Blessing

Managing, Mentoring, and Hiring: Why is it so damn hard?

4 min read

Think sticker

The super-cool Think Brownstone stickers I gave away at BarCamp!

I had the privilege of leading a problem solving discussion at BarCamp Philly this past Saturday. The session was proposed at the last moment (while the first sessions were going on) in response to a few conversations I had over morning coffee -- I was amazed to end up in a packed room full of very vocal people! It's clear our community has a lot to discuss on the topics of management, mentoring, and hiring. Thanks to everyone for participating and making this such an engaging session!

Here are photos of the blackboard notes/mind-map -- they're a bit blurry, but you still make out most of the text and the lines connecting ideas.

  1. Define the Problem "Screen Shots": 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
  2. Mentoring focus "Screen Shots": 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

A transcription of all the blackboard notes follows -- but I think the big takeaway of the session were the mentoring action steps we identified:

  1. Define mentoring: what are you trying to achieve?
  2. Carve out the time: make it important, protect it, make it part of everyone's job
  3. Ask: not for mentoring but for information, for input, "how can I help?"
  4. Do things together and make it visible
  5. Express thanks

Before you go through the full notes: I'm serious about getting together again to continue the conversation! Please leave a comment on this blog post, email me, or @/DM me on Twitter so I can be sure you get an invite to the meetup!


Define the problem

    • No mentoring at many places
    • Hard to mentor if you're not being mentored
      • No managerial/organizational support
        • Do you set aside time for mentoring activities?
    • No one gives a shit when trying to mentor
    • Bidirectional mentoring: [other party] not always interested
    • Finding people / the right people
      • People with potential
      • Headhunters [=] Noise
      • [Many] unqualified candidates
      • Depends on company: hiring for culture, skills, experience?
        • Do we even know what we're hiring for?
          • Speedy growth
          • Same job title (not description) means different things at different companies
            • Different responsibilities, different expectations (on both sides)
          • As person being hired:
            • Why am I being hired?
            • What am I doing?
            • Is it OK to ask questions?
      • Dilution of credentials
        • PhD [in CS] but can't code
        • As jobseeker, educationally over-qualified, less job experience
          • Resume format hasn't changed, how do you present yourself?
            • Cover letter still important!
          • For developers, where is the code portfolio?
      • What is the qualification to get through?
        • Puzzles
        • Quizzes
        • Essays
      • Can someone meet our expectations?
        • [Example: job posting asking for] 10 years of jQuery experience
    • Hiring
      • Tools are shitty and inhibit process
        • Broad job posting not effective
      • Expensive! Job portal posting and lots of asshats apply
      • [Managing/researching applicants]
        • Resumator + LinkedIn
        • Stack Overflow
        • Ranking candidates
          • Bullet Analytics
      • Where to post jobs locally?
        • Technically Philly job board - will have job fair in 2014
        • Local network and community
          • Be an active participant in community so people want to work with/for you
          • Most groups are for senior/advanced people
          • How to go from email to action?
        • How to find junior talent?
          • Campus Philly
          • Drexel Co-Ops (people love them)
    • At this point, we were 15 minutes into our time, so we voted on one area to focus on; the group chose mentoring.

Focus on Mentoring

  • This is a skill in and of itself!
  • Big difference between mentoring and training
    • What is the hidden curriculum in your organization?
  • Finding time
    • Carve it out
  • Care more!
    • How to make those NOT in this room care more?
      • How do we encourage more soft mentors?
        • Make it a requirement
  • Coaching
    • Helping people express themselves makes them better at what they do
  • Apprenticeship
    • Formal programs
  • Context/structure
    • "Soft" mentoring instead of formal
      • Team collaboration and valuing others' opinions?
      • Recognition is important
      • How to find a mentor as a junior person?
        • Look for someone who is passionate about what they do
        • Look for someone who is open
        • Show them what you're working on
        • Ask
          • We aren't taught to ask good questions
            • Are we hiring people who won't ask by looking for purple squirrels (super ninja rockstars are self confident)
            • [Nor are we taught] to recognize others, e.g. acknowledge someone in code comments
          • Conversation starters:
            • What's wrong with this?
            • What am I missing?
            • What have you tried?
    • Some organizations separate mentoring from management
      • [Why?] This introduces BIAS in management process
  • Why is this a corporate expectation? Why don't kids go out and find [their] own mentors?
  • Manager != Leader, Leader != Manager
    • Being a mentor is a differentiator

Mentoring Action Steps

  1. Define mentoring: what are you trying to achieve?
  2. Carve out the time: make it important, protect it, make it part of everyone's job
  3. Ask: not for mentoring but for information, for input, "how can I help?"
  4. Do things together and make it visible
  5. Express thanks

Kimberly Blessing

Unspoken expectations don’t work

1 min read

Unspoken expectations don’t work. Then again, some expectations, when communicated, may just go a bit too far.

If you don’t care about the French toast, then perhaps you don’t care about anything is my train of thought on the matter, and if you don’t care about anything, then working for me doesn’t seem feasible, as I have an insatiable desire to be surrounded by people who care as much as I do.

Stanley Kubrick, Some Instructions to the New Guy Concerning the Preparation and Presentation of My French Toast

Kimberly Blessing

Empathy is for Every One

3 min read

Title borrowed/tweaked from this Pastry Box post... with thanks to Viviana for the reminder.

I screwed up this week. I didn't mean to, of course. I did something, made a decision, for good and right reasons. I just did an incredibly poor job of communicating that something to others. Normally, that's not a really big deal, but in this case, it was. And so my screw up ended up occupying too many people's minds and time for too much of the week.

The first word in the name of this blog is People. I've realized that, throughout my career, when People didn't come first, things go wrong. And you can't just say that you're putting People first, you have to actually do it. To me, putting People first means having empathy for each individual, and considering their needs. Empathy is a crucial part of respect and trust, in my opinion.

I am best at putting People first when it comes to my team. Wherever I've worked, I have found empathy for those who reported to me, and I think/hope it has made me a good manager and leader. It hasn't always been easy, although it usually is. This week, my empathy for my team was running very high.

When it comes to the other end of the organization -- my peers and those higher in the leadership chain -- I realize that I sometimes forget about having empathy for the individual. Sometimes I get caught up in referring to "the management team" when all I see is bureaucracy. I have to stop and remind myself to see the People instead.

While empathy on my part can go a long way, it's ultimately a two-way street. I think we complain about working for our bosses, The Man, or Corporate America because those roles and organizations don't exhibit much or any empathy towards us. Too often, they demand respect due to their authority -- they intimidate and instill fear rather than communicate to understand and build trust. This, my friends, is debilitating.

Ultimately, I wasn't in a debilitating situation this week. I felt empathy for a member of my team, and I acted in that person's best interests. But I wasn't feeling any empathy for those I needed to inform about my actions, and I botched the communication. I'm shifting perspective and making amends, and writing this blog post to remind myself, because I know it will happen again.

Time to write "Empathy is for Every One" on a sticky note and put it on my monitor. Or, maybe have it tattooed on my hand.

Kimberly Blessing

Pausing for a new year reflection

3 min read

Reflection, by Kimberly Blessing

Since my last real post here, over four months ago, I've been asked countless times why I don't blog more. I've received numerous emails from people who've thanked me for the advice I've offered here, and I can tell from the stats that people are still visiting. Don't worry -- I haven't given up on the blog, and I get that you're still interested in what I have to say. To which I can only say, thank you! I will get back to posting soon. But let me update you on some changes in my world.

Last month I transitioned into a new role at CIM: that of senior software architect, focused on web front-end engineering. It's exciting and it's scary, as any change is. I've put a lot of time and effort into developing my management and leadership skills and changing some bad behaviors, but I don't think any of that will go to waste in this new role. One becomes a software architect, in part, because of one's leadership skills, and having experienced managing some of the people I'll continue to work with only gives me greater insight into their talents and strengths, so I can help them accomplish more. From a technical skills perspective, while I've kept up on HTML, CSS, and browsers, there are a whole host of languages and technologies I need to brush up on or get acquainted with. I don't need to be the expert on everything, but I do need to hold my own in conversations with Java programmers, system administrators, and even other front-end developers. Most importantly, though, I need to buckle down and write more, so that my thoughts, research, ideas, and questions are available both to myself and others. As you, dear reader, can probably tell, sitting down and making myself write out my thoughts is not one of my strengths!

I will also be busy these next few months teaching a web application design and development class at Bryn Mawr College. I first had the opportunity to teach this "recent topics" computer science class at the end of 2008, and it was popular enough that the students asked the department chair to bring me back! I'm honored that every space in the class is full, and I hope to challenge both the students and myself by looking more into creating single web experiences which adapt nicely to the mobile environment. I am still thinking about whether I will re-present or make available the course materials to a broader audience, online.

I'm also preparing to present at some conferences this year and I'm working on a few other projects. I joked, on Twitter, that my theme word for 2011 should be "over-committed" and that's definitely true. So the mantra I'm repeating to myself is one I recently got in a fortune cookie:

You cannot be anything if you want to be everything.

A good reminder to all of us. Happy new year!

Kimberly Blessing

Understand and Leverage Your Strengths

4 min read

I like to know things about myself. Don't you? I've taken personality tests and behavioral assessments to be more self-aware, to learn what I should focus on in my personal development efforts, and to better understand how I related to and communicate with other people. OK, and for fun. You've probably done the same, right?

Me with my StrengthsFinder book My strengths are: Command, Deliberative, Significance, Strategic, and Learner.

My favorite self-assessment is one that many people don't know about: StrengthsFinder 2.0. StrengthsFinder is both a book and a test: the book includes an introduction to StrengthsFinder, a code for accessing an online assessment tool, and an explanation of the 34 strengths (or "themes"). The assessment results in a customized report which will help you understand your strengths and how you can use them to be more effective in both your work and your personal life.

Personally, StrengthsFinder has really helped me embrace my strengths. For example, I used to think of myself as "bossy" (because that's how people described me) and I looked for ways of toning down this "weakness". But learning that my number one strength was Command made me feel different -- it helped me understand that being the boss is a natural position for me and that people look to me to lead them. It made me realize that having formal management and leadership responsibilities would make me a happier, more productive person, rather than a cranky and bossy individual contributor.

You may already see why, as a manager, I love StrengthsFinder. We can't all verbalize what we're good at or what kind of work we love to do. For a while, I've asked everyone on my teams to take the test and share their results with me. Once I know what strengths a person has, I can better leverage their skills to make them -- and the team -- more successful.

For example, in the software development community, most programmers have one of the rational temperaments (ENTJ, INTJ, ENTP, or INTP). But if you manage a team of programmers, you can't just look at them as a a bunch of INTJs (a very common type for programmers, though a very small percentage of the overall population) -- you need to see them as individuals. INTJs are introverts and can be brutally honest, but that doesn't mean that they can't be persuasive communicators to large groups. StrengthsFinder gives me far more specific information about a person than a behavior or personality test can tell me.

StrengthsFinder Team Top 5 Grid

Once a group of people complete their StrengthsFinder assessments, you can chart their results to determine overall group themes. I've done this with three teams of employees at different companies and the results are always enlightening. For example, about half of my present team has the "Adaptability" strength -- this is perfect for our team because our product strategy has shifted around quite a bit in recent months, so we have people who can roll with those changes. We also have about 50% "Input" and "Learner": both are crucial to the way we operate. Where we have only one or two people exhibiting a certain strength, I see how I can use those individuals to encourage the overall team, to ask important questions, or to sustain us when the sh*t hits the fan (a necessary evil).

Strengths Finder 2.0

What are you waiting for? Learn more or buy StrengthsFinder 2.0 now and take the test. Learn about yourself. Share the results with your family and team. Encourage others to take it and share their results. At the very least, it should confirm what you already know about yourself -- but I'll bet you'll learn something new, too.

Have you already taken StrengthsFinder? What are your Top 5? What have you learned about yourself or others?

Kimberly Blessing

Celebrating Ada Lovelace Day 2010

8 min read

My Ada Lovelace Day post is a two-parter: the first part, recognizing two women who inspired me in math and computing; the second, recognizing Milly Koss, an inspirational and accomplished female computer scientist.

Ada Lovelace Day is an international day of blogging to celebrate the achievements of women in technology and science. Learn more

Mrs. Smarkola, Miss Herrick, and the Dawn Patrol

Article about The Dawn Patrol From the Grace Park Mini News, an article about Dawn Patrol by yours truly, circa 1985.

I am so fortunate to have been raised in the 80s, during the emergence of the personal computer. My school, Grace Park Elementary, and my teachers were excited about the TRS-80s and Apple IIes in the classroom, and many kids had Commodore 64s at home. Our teachers saw us get excited about learning; we were having fun playing with new toys our parents never had.

Our librarian, Mrs. Smarkola, was one of my most favorite people at school. When I think of her, I always imagine her with a large book in hand, head down, adjusting her glasses, focused on her reading. But I also remember her running the classroom full of typewriters and computers which was across the hall from the library. She'd walk from computer to computer, typing commands, turning them on or off, inserting tapes or disks, making sure each computer had an instruction sheet or book for the next activity. Around the time of fourth grade, a few of those computers moved into the library itself, and the whole school used them to check out and return books -- under Mrs. Smarkola's watchful eye, of course.

My fourth grade teacher, Miss Herrick, was one of those teachers that all of the kids in school were afraid of. Kids talked about her being "hard" and "mean" -- but when I got in to her classroom, I was in heaven. You see, Miss Herrick loved math. I loved math. We were a perfect match! She frequently gave us math quizzes with long division problems, which I always aimed to complete first -- because the first to finish got to "play" on the computer we had in the classroom. I'd guess that I spent more time on that computer than anyone else, and I think I was also the classroom "computer aide," to help other students with it. (BTW, to this day, I love doing long division in my head when I'm bored.)

So many of us kids at Grace Park were interested in computers and learning, that our awesome principal, Dr. Joseph Fleischut, authorized a program called "Dawn Patrol" which was run by Mrs. Smarkola and Miss Herrick. For kids who signed up and got to school about 30 minutes before the opening bell, it was a time to use the computers, typewriters, and library. As you may have guessed, I signed up nearly every day. It may have been during Dawn Patrol that I programmed a TRS-80 CoCo 2 to play the harmony to "Yesterday" by The Beatles, so that it could accompany me as I played the melody on the flute. (When I got to perform at the district concert with the computer, it choked under the hot lights of the stage, sadly.) It also may have been there that I first attempted to program a Joshua-like AI from WarGames. I definitely spent time playing the Oregon Trail and Carmen Sandiego games there, as well as being questioned by Eliza. But what I remember with the greatest certainty (and the utmost thanks!) were the ways in which Mrs. Smarkola and Miss Herrick (and Dr. Fly, too) encouraged me, nurtured my passion for math, computers, reading, and learning, and always praised me for my accomplishments -- key factors which recent studies say are crucial to getting more women in to STEM.

Adele Mildred (Milly) Koss

Milly Koss and Me I was introduced to Milly Koss in September 2006 when a historical marker was placed at the site of the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation.

Milly Koss "had a distinguished career of more than 47 years in all phases of computer technology, implementation and management, including applications design and development, software/hardware selection, database technologies and computer security." Her name is known to some -- but not enough, in my opinion.

Milly was raised in Philadelphia and attended the selective Philadelphia High School for Girls. She earned a scholarship to attend the University of Pennsylvania in 1946, at a time when schools were primarily giving spots to veterans. She graduated in 1950 with a degree in mathematics. In the early days of computing, women were seen as ideal computer programmers due to their "patience, persistence, and a capacity for detail." Of course, in order for a woman to get one of these jobs, she had to have a degree in math and not be married. Milly Koss qualified on the first point, but not on the second: she was engaged. The first company she interviewed with rejected her for this reason.

Fortunately, she was in the right place -- Philadelphia was home to the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation and, from the way Milly describes it, I imagine it to be a workplace much like any modern internet company -- except that 40% of their programmers were women. Milly interviewed with Dr. John Mauchly, who she described as being very nice, flexible, and open. He gave her a wonderful, exciting, creative job -- working with the UNIVAC.

Milly worked with Grace Hopper and was responsible for developing Editing Generator, a problem-oriented language for computer-generated reports, in 1952. Milly was interested in what "computers could do for programmers... how it could help programmers program." She also worked on sort routines for years, which she calls "the quintessential program for machines." She reminds us that today we should be grateful for that early work in automated programming, interpreters, assemblers, and compilers.

By the way, much of this she did while working part-time and remotely! According to Milly, when informed about her pregnancy, Grace Hopper told her to "take it home" -- meaning, the work. Milly would go in to the office one or two days a week, otherwise working from her dining room table. In an interview with Kathy Kleiman (who is the driving force behind the ENIAC Programmers Project), Milly said:

"What’s funny about that period, I’m not sure who my boss was. This was such an unstructured environment… Once I had a child they let me continue to work the way I wanted to. I inferred from that I was of value to them. Nobody lets you work that way unless they are getting value. I got increases. I got paid fairly well. Eckert & Mauchly was pretty good that way… There were no models, they didn’t care how you worked. There were no preconceived notions as to the way you could contribute. You did not have to be in the office…. We did not have huge management teams. We did incredibly new and exciting things and nobody had a problem.”

Milly later went to work for Burroughs Corporation, Philco, and Control Data Corporation, and Raytheon. At Burroughs and Philco she continued her flexible work schedule and would send her work in by mail! At CDC, she worked with early graphics algorithms and interfaces including light pens. Then Milly moved to Harvard University, where says she finally started feeling the hierarchy and loss of flexibility. She spent 27 years at Harvard, in multiple roles. She applied data management expertise to applications for the school and led an R&D effort to develop one of the first data warehouses, the Information Utility. She served as Associate Director of the Office for Information Technology and as the Information Security Officer for the university.

Milly retired in 1994. In 1997, she received a Pioneer Award at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. In 2000, she received the Ada August Lovelace Award from the Association for Women in Computing. With her many years of contributions to the field, I'm sure she also inspired many people -- women and men alike.

Additional Resources

Kimberly Blessing

Epic Management Fails

6 min read

"who's able here to honestly say 'I have a great boss'?" two hands raised... 320 persons in the room... Via Daniel Glazman on Twitter

Although I always identify myself as a technologist, I've been managing people for a while and that is the primary focus of my full-time work. Managing people is an art, not a science. It's very hard work, and I didn't completely understand this before becoming a manager. Honestly, I don't think most people -- even managers -- understand how hard of a job this can be.

I think that I've become a pretty good manager -- with time and experience, with feedback and mentoring. There were times when I wasn't so great, though. In an attempt at radical honesty (hat tip to Erica O'Grady), here is a list of my epic management fails and what I've learned from them.

  • I tried to keep my hands in the code. Somewhere I once heard that coders who become managers and still try to write code only do so because they're arrogant and they end up sucking at both. While I don't agree 100% with that statement, I can agree that diverting focus from management responsibilities can have a negative impact on people and projects. As a manager I've gotten so deep into code that I've trampled on the responsibilities and goals of my direct reports. I've also made commitments to deliver production-ready code but then been so distracted by management responsibilities that I caused project deadlines to be missed. While attempting to code for production work isn't a good idea for managers, I think that coding for practice -- to keep one's skills in shape or to have experience with what the team is working on -- is definitely a good thing. A technical manager who can coach a team on both a personal and a technical level is a huge asset.
  • I didn't prepare for one-on-one meetings. One of the top priorities of a manager is meeting with direct reports on a regular basis to review expectations, set and track progress of goals, provide feedback, and coach for achievement. If you ignore this responsibility as a manager, you're not doing your job, period.* Over time, I've realized that some managers avoid these meetings because they're not prepared. I've certainly made the mistake of meeting with an individual without having an agenda, or without having deliverables ready. Ever had an awkward review with your boss? Chances are, it was awkward because they weren't prepared. I find that I have to practice difficult conversations before I walk in to a meeting, and I even like to rehearse giving feedback. When I'm nervous about a meeting, I know I'm not prepared. When I realize this, I'll try to reschedule the meeting or, worst case scenario, I'll admit to being unprepared and beg forgiveness.

    However, even if you conduct regular one-on-ones, you can do it very poorly. For example, I've had managers who've spent most of my one-on-one time talking to or emailing other people, just talking the entire time without listening, and even zoning out (staring at the ceiling, a piece of furniture). Other faux-pas include glaring at the person (or eye-rolling, laughing at inappropriate times), only giving negative feedback, never offering assistance, and never asking for feedback.

  • I wanted more (or less or something different) for someone. I'm an overachiever and I've always had a vision for what I could and should be doing in any job. I know that not everyone is this way, yet somehow this fact escaped me early in my management career. Some of my earliest supervisees were just doing a job, with no vision for themselves in the future, so I adopted a style of pushing my own vision for a person's career. I could pat myself on the back for the times in which this worked out, but there were times where this approach certainly backfired -- such as the strong generalist who I thought should specialize in an area they didn't care for, or the developer who I saw moving up the tech ladder when they wanted to move into management. Having a dialog not just about about an individual's current role and goals but also about their future is crucial. I like to do this at least twice a year, now, to ensure that my direct reports and I are on the same page.
  • I hired someone despite having concerns about their ability to do the job. This is a tough one to address in generalities, but I'll try. Any hiring decision should be backed up with evidence gathered through a rigorous interview process. Every new hire presents some level of risk, but you want to have primarily positive feelings about a hiring decision, not concerns. I have, on occasion, made hiring decisions based less on evidence and more on what I thought could be possible, given training, coaching, and mentoring. Sometimes it has worked out wonderfully. Other times it's been a painful experience for both the individual who was hired and for me. I do believe in giving people a chance, though, so I can't totally knock taking these risks. These days I try to be open about expectations prior to hiring and I reinforce those expectations once the individual walks in the door in regular one-on-ones. I don't usually out-and-out express my concerns, though -- this can kill a person's confidence! But if I must, I'll also express my support for the person and assume responsibility for making sure the right things are in place for the person to be successful.
  • I let my own issues get in the way of my responsibilities. Anyone who's followed me on Twitter for the past year has seen this one first hand. I started a new job last January and spent almost the entire year unhappy with my role, the work, and number of other things. I focused on the frustration, vented publicly, and let public response further fuel my discontent. All of this distraction consumed me; meanwhile my team languished. I began planning an exit strategy and engaged an awesome career coach who ended up reminding me of my strengths and reignited my passion for creating positive change. I set to work on creating a plan to address not only what was making me unhappy but also what I felt was missing from making our organization a powerhouse. I'm now executing on that plan and seeing small successes, which I hope to grow into larger successes this year.

Do you recognize any of these epic fails, either personally or in a manager you've worked with? Does your organization have a strong culture of coaching and mentoring managers to prevent against these and other fails? Share your story below for others to learn from. I'll share my epic wins later!

Kimberly Blessing

The Problem Isn't IE6 -- It's You

5 min read

This post is going to upset a lot of people, I'm sure, but what I have to say needs to be said, if only to remind members of our community to behave themselves.

Is Internet Explorer 6 an old, outdated, hanger-on of a browser? Yes, absolutely. Does it require the use code hacks in order to achieve semi-parity with more modern browsers? Yes, it does. Should this be such a problem for web professionals? No, it shouldn't.

IE6 Cartoon Thanks, Tracy Apps!

For a moment, forget about all of IE6's issues, security, how much you dislike Microsoft, or whatever baggage you're carrying around. Instead, think about IE6 as an unknown browser -- perhaps as a random blip in your browser stats, or maybe as an interesting piece of tech you've seen on a blog or at a conference. You don't know much about that browser or how your site is going to work on it, so what do you? You code it using web standards goodness: you create a base with semantic markup (and any server-side tech for forms), add on design via CSS, then layer on client-side interactivity with JavaScript and Ajax-y goodness -- et voilà, you have a lovely, robust web experience.

Now, with some new or unknown browser, you hope for the best. But with IE6, we know what the issues are. If you're using PNGs with alpha-transparency in your design, you'll need an alternate solution. If you're adding horizontal margins to floats, you know you'll run in to a double-margin bug. If you're trying to clear floats within a parent, you know you need to set height. You'll need to plan for handling unsupported CSS selectors. And when it comes to JavaScript, you may not even know what to plan for (unless you spend most of your days working with JS).

But again, you're a web professional. You know your craft. You know this platform and its issues. (If you don't, you need to know your craft better. No, I don't buy "newness" to the field as an excuse -- this is still a present concern, so you need to understand it! Why not start with my CSS tips for IE6.) While some venting may be in order, I find the outright hatred for this browser (and other versions of IE, also bashed on a regular basis) to be downright unprofessional. Here's why:

  1. IE is still #1. While recent reports cite that its market share is shrinking, IE (all versions combined) is still the number one browser in use worldwide. The snide comments I've seen people make about IE (which I won't link to) often extend to remarks about IE users, which is just about the uncoolest thing I've witnessed. Respect the user, regardless of browser!
  2. IE6 use is shrinking. With the growing number of sites proactively messaging that support is being discontinued for IE6, its share should continue to shrink, which will lessen your burden over time. (You do have an actively managed browser support policy, to help you identify when you don't have to support it any longer, right?) Celebrate that people are upgrading instead of harping on the stragglers.
  3. Promote the best experience. Instead of complaining about having to make a fancy widget work perfectly on IE6, engage with the client/product/design team to explain how you can deliver the best possible experience to every user by honoring only what each browser is truly capable of, rather than let one browser hold you back. You now have plenty of real world examples (Google Apps, Digg, Facebook, YouTube, etc.) to back you up on this!
  4. Help prepare for the future. Remind those in decision-making roles that the more time you spend looking backwards at the old, the less time you have to prepare for the new. Since I haven't met a business owner (small, corporate, or otherwise) who doesn't like "new", this should snap them back to their primary focus of strategies that save money and provide for the future.
  5. Don't make yourself look like an ass. If I'm one of those poor souls still stuck supporting (or, perhaps worse, using) IE6 and I'm trying to hire someone, do you think I'm going to hire the person who's been hating on that browser all over the interwebs? Umm, no.

I know folks are going to jump in with all sorts of comments about me not thinking about Ajax-y web apps or super beautiful design-y sites. The thing is, I do work on and continue to lead a team which works on these types of sites and apps, and yes, we're supporting IE6 in all cases. No, it's not to pixel perfection. No, the functionality we build for a new browser isn't 100% replicated. But these sites aren't as far off as you might think* -- and in the cases where I'm using hacks or JS shims to get IE6 into compliance, I also have easy code management techniques for dropping support.

*In fact, very recently, after preparing business and design teams to accept far less functionality in IE6, my team delivered a cool animated design-y thing that worked perfectly in that browser! (It's not live yet, but I'll update this when it is.)

So take the time to inform and to educate about browser differences and support strategies. Enthusiastically suggest alternatives to your team. Track your browser metrics and get happy about those numbers changing. Say a small thank you to those at Microsoft who are working to improve IE. Get inside the IE6 user's head and present their story, not your own tale of woe. If you need help, ask for it.

Seriously, it'll save you from looking like an ass.

Kimberly Blessing

Seeking Your Suggestions

2 min read

Photo of Kimberly by Ari Stiles

Welcome to my new blog! I wanted to ditch my old blog in order to start something new and focused. While my old blog varied widely from the professional to the personal, this blog will be focused on Web development and management topics. And while posting at the old blog was hit or miss, I've committed to Project 52, so new content will be appearing on this site weekly.

My first set of posts will be targeted at job-seeking Web developers, discussing topics like what to include in a code portfolio and how to prepare for a technical interview. As someone who has done a lot of hiring (and is doing so currently, hint hint) I hope to give some valuable advice to those looking to make job moves in 2010.

While I have some other topics planned, I'd love to get your input on what other topics I should cover. I have experience in championing Web standards, crafting code for heavily-trafficked sites, constructing content management systems, and building and leading strong teams. So, what are your questions? What issues are you facing? Tell me in the comments or email me at obiwan at kimberly blessing dot com. And thanks for joining me!

Kimberly Blessing

Moving to a new blog

1 min read

After blogging here on a mish-mash of topics for a number of years, I'm shuttering this blog and moving on to a new domain, focused on web development and technical management. I hope you'll join me at Obi-Wan Kimberly!