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Kimberly Blessing

Crossfit WOD 2018 March 13

1 min read

Row 2000m
30 Wall Balls (20#/14#, 11'/10')
Row 1000m
30 Box Jumps (30"/24")
Row 500m
30 Box Jumps (24"/20")

24:27 doing step ups instead of box jumps, 2k row in 10:00

Kimberly Blessing

Crossfit WOD 2018 March 12

1 min read

15 minutes to find a 1RM for today

65 x2, 75 x2, 85 x2, 95, 100 (messy), 105 fail

For time:
5 Bar Muscle-up
5 Front Squat (60% of Today's 1RM Clean)
10 C2B Pull ups
10 Power Clean (60% of Today's 1RM Clean)
15 Pull ups
15 Deadlift (60% of Today's 1RM Clean)
15 Pull ups
10 Power Clean (60% of Today's 1RM Clean)
10 C2B Pull ups
5 Front Squat (60% of Today's 1RM Clean)
5 Bar Muscle-up

- jumping MUs, C2Bs, PUs
- 65#
- 9:20

Kimberly Blessing

Crossfit WOD 2018 Jan 10

1 min read

Hang Clean x 2
Find a heavy double for today, no more than 8 sets.

65, 75, 85, 95, 100, 105 - 1 HPC, 100, 105 - 1 HC

6 rounds for time:
6 Handstand Push-up (subbed L-sit DB press @ 15#)
6 Hang Power Clean (95/65)*
6 Toes-to-Bar

Kimberly Blessing

Crossfit WOD 2018 Jan 3

1 min read

Every 90 seconds x 18 (27 minutes)
10 Back Squat (120, 130)
10 DB Floor Press (20, 30)
10 Strict Pull up (light + mini band)
10 V-up
10 Strict Press (60, 40)
10 Strict Supinated Pull up (light + mini band)
10 Front Squat (85, 85)
10 Push up (mini band)
10 DB Hammer Curl (15, 15)

Kimberly Blessing

2015 Year in Review

5 min read

TL;DR: I turned 40 but felt like I was 16.

This is my first post on my new Known-driven site. I'll be aggregating all of my various web content here going forward. I've posted a few year-in-review type things on Facebook in the past, but I can't find them to figure out what format I used,.. and honestly, that platform is crap. Anything where you're not in control of your data is crap. Self-publishing is where it's at. Still. Let's get back to it.

Anyway... this was a year of ups and downs, as I expected. Turning 40 wasn't that big a deal, although it's fun to toss around that number and get wide-eyed looks from people. ("You can't be 40!" was the typical response.) Learning to be single again... ugh. Nursing a broken heart was painful, remembering how much I hate to cook caused me to eat out far too often, and dating introduced me to all sorts of interesting characters. Music, books, Crossfit, and good friends made all of it better, though.

At the start of 2015, I knew that I'd be seeing Ride seven times this year... but their comeback was so massive -- they were better than ever! -- that they kept on adding tour dates and I kept on buying tickets. In the end, I went to 17 Ride shows, thus making up for a good bit of lost time. I'm surprised my ears aren't still ringing after: Swervedriver, Ride (their warm-up show, in their hometown of Oxford!), They Might Be Giants, Ride (Atlanta), Primal Screen, Ride (Glasgow), Ride (London), Ride (Amsterdam), Ride (Paris), Ride (Brooklyn), Ride (Toronto), Ride (Terminal 5 NYC), Morrissey, Paul McCartney, The Dead Milkmen, The Containment Unit (Stratford ON), Elle King (NYC), Dick Dale, Popup Opera performing L'Italiana in Algeri (London), Ride (at home in Philadelphia!), Ride (Irving Plaza NYC), The Jesus and Mary Chain, Ride (Asbury Park), Ride (Chicago), Severed Heads and Cocksure (Cold Waves IV in Chicago), Kraftwerk, Ride (Boston), Ride (Bristol UK), Blur (MSG NYC), The Dead Milkmen, Ride (Portland), Ride (Seattle - my last show of the tour!), and The Ocean Blue. (And probably one tonight!)

With all of those shows, it might seem like there wasn't much time for new music, but oh, there was. I'm obsessed with TVAM's Porsche Majeure, Besnard Lakes (who opened for Ride), Cocksure's sophomore release "Corporate Sting" as well as Chris Connelly's twelfth solo release "Decibels from Heart", Ruby's "Waiting for Light", Most Non-Heinous, Boxed In, Rodriguez... and I'm sure I'm forgetting many other tracks and albums. (And Rdio, I will miss you.)

More importantly, I made my own new music this year -- for the first time since... well, since my grandfather died 21 years ago. That requires a lot of unpacking and will have to wait for a separate post, although, again, Ride gets a lot of credit here.

In May, I was excited to see Neil Gaiman read from his latest book, Trigger Warning, and answer questions. He answered my question, which I was thrilled by! (And still have yet to write about.) I was less thrilled when I returned home that night to find that I had been robbed. (Another fucking growth experience.) Due to the association between book and robbery, I still haven't read his new book. But I re-read American Gods and The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and followed Sandman Overture to its end. I finally picked up Phonogram, after being introduced to The Wicked and The Divine. I eagerly read Ernie Cline's new book, Armada, and slogged through the entire Outlander series, after years of many friends recommending it to me. I read The Martian before the movie came out (and loved both). I read The Phoenix Project, A Line of Blood (by Ben McPherson), and Canary (by Duane Swierczynski) on recommendations from friends and loved them all. (A Line of Blood particularly creeped me out. I highly recommend it.) And for self-help, I read Brene Brown, Pema Chodron, and most of the School of Life series.

I kicked ass at Crossfit this year. I finally made it into the 200 Club, backsquatting 203 pounds and deadlifting 232 pounds at our last Total. I've built enough upper body strength to be able to snatch more than an empty training bar and I can even overhead squat 75 pounds! I still can't do a bodyweight pull up, but I can hang from a bar for 60 seconds, and I can even kick up into a handstand and hold it for 30 seconds.

If I mention one friend, I'll have to mention them all... and I'm sure to forget someone, so let's not go there. Suffice it to say that if we had a heart-to-heart over coffee, a drink, a meal, Twitter, email, crayons, standing in line for a concert, standing against the barrier at a show, hanging around backstage at a show... you had an impact on me this year.

Love and hugs and all the best wishes for 2016. Let's kick it in the balls.

Kimberly Blessing

The Web (Browser) We Forgot

1 min read

Earlier this month I spoke at the O'Reilly Fluent Conference about the browser that truly popularized the Web in its infancy -- the line mode browser. The video of my keynote is online, as well as an interview where I talk about everything from the line mode browser to the problems of modern-day developers.

Kimberly Blessing

The Web at 25: Lessons Learned, Forgotten, and Rediscovered

1 min read

I was honored to be a part of Denmark's first front-end focused web development conference, At the Frontend on November 4, 2014. There I talked about the history of the web through the story of my trip to CERN as part of the line-mode browser hack days project, and some thoughts on how lessons from then are still incredibly relevant today. (slides)

Kimberly Blessing

Giving Credit Where It's Due on Ada Lovelace Day 2014

3 min read

I haven't written a post for Ada Lovelace Day in a few years (last in 2010) and recent conversations have made one feel necessary. When the contributions and accomplishments of my female contemporaries on the Web are unknown to people just a generation behind, I get extremely concerned. After all, the making of the Web is the making of history in modern times. As I've pointed out before, we have the opportunity to document our times and lives unlike never before -- but data loss can occur. And it is.

Twenty years ago, when I was in college and learning how to create web pages, I pretty much had two sources of information: documentation written by TimBL and USENET newsgroups. But once I started working professionally, I realized that there was a wealth of information being printed on paper. And what I saw was that large numbers of these books on web development and design were being written by women.

Me and Molly HolzschlagMe with Molly Holzschlag

Women such as:

I wish I could tell you exactly how many books these women have collectively written -- I'm sure it's over 100 -- but quick searches of their bios and websites doesn't always make this data clear. Is it modesty? Do multiple editions make the numbers tricky? I don't know.

But when I mention the names of these women -- all of whom are still active online, many of whom are still writing (or speaking) about the web and programming -- to web developers today, I'm often met with blank stares. I'll have to mention that Lynda founded, (still!) one of the top online training sites, or that Jen co-founded the extremely popular ARTIFACT conference. I have to explain that Dori has helped run Wise Women's Web, one of the earliest communities for female developers online, and that we have Molly to thank for convincing Bill Gates and Microsoft to be more open about Internet Explorer development at Microsoft (there are so many articles to link to, but I want to link to Molly's old blog posts, which are gone *sadface*).

While my past ALD posts have been happy remembrances of people who've made positive impacts on my life, this post is written out of frustration -- and even a bit of anger -- that the contributions of these women are being forgotten or overlooked in their own time. Let's give credit where it's due. Comment or blog or tweet about the books written by these women that helped you learn your craft. Send them a thank you email or tweet. (In Molly's case, you can give to her fund.) Share this post or the links to these women's websites with someone who needs to learn about their foremothers. And just be thankful that women helped light the path for others by sharing knowledge about building the World Wide Web.

Kimberly Blessing

BlogHer '14: Preserving Your Online Content

4 min read

BlogHer 10th Anniversary Celebration

Earlier this year, I read (and raved about) Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin by Jill Lepore. One of the obvious realizations when reading this book is that today we have little first-source material of the average person's life from this era -- and especially little of it from women. It's only because of Jane's famous brother that her writing has survived -- and through that correspondence, we can learn so much.

That seems to be a theme for me, this year: I've been thinking a lot about how we document and preserve information -- stories, photos, videos, etc. -- online, whether for ourselves (ooh, the cloud), to share with family and friends (social media), or for posterity. I was first drawn to the web, 20 years ago, as cheaper means of communication... but like so many others, have realized the wealth of history we're documenting as well. It's important to me that we preserve that history... because, even though we think the Internet never forgets, it does.

So, when the good folks at BlogHer approached me about participating in this year's 10th anniversary conference, I thought this would be the perfect subject to talk about. Except I'm not talking... I'm running a Geek Bar instead! This means that I'll be helping bloggers who are interested in hands-on learning and help on how to preserve their online content. This post is a short summary of some of the material I expect we'll review and resources we'll need to reference, mostly for WordPress users (non-developers). Whether you're at my session or not, you may find this information useful and you're welcome to contribute your own! (I'll update this post later with anything else we cover.)

Backing up your blog

If you're blogging on a free or paid service, learn about what backups they're creating and whether or not you can get access to them. If you're paying for hosting and running your own blog, add a backup subscription service or set up your own backup solution.

  • For WordPress: VaultPress, Backup Buddy, and loads of other plugins.
  • If you're looking for something that will (likely) outlive you, submit your site to the Internet Archive for archiving (via the "save page now" form). Make sure your web page templates or robots.txt do not include NOARCHIVE.

Better broken links

Nobody likes getting a 404 (page not found)... and they're not good for search engines or archiving tools, if you want them to get your content! Help 'em out:

Moving and taking down content

If services go offline, you choose to switch providers or domains, or you simply choose to take content offline, you're going to want folks (and search engines) to know.

  • Familiarize yourself with the HTTP status codes. Here's a quick review of the most relevant ones:
    • 200 OK - this is what you want folks to get, in addition to your content
    • 301 Moved Permanently - if you're moving between services/URLs, you want this to be the redirect type
    • 302 Found or 307 Temporary Redirect - if you're having momentary issues and want to send readers somewhere else for a short time
    • 404 Page Not Found - the one we don't want people to get
    • 410 Gone - what you want to send when you've taken something down and don't ever intend for it to come back
  • If your site runs on Apache, learn about Redirect and Alias directives which you can set in your .htaccess file.
  • Yes, there are WordPress redirect manager plugins, too.

Solutions for all of your online content

What about your Facebook posts, tweets, Instagram pics, and other content on third-party sites? You can save those, too!

Kimberly Blessing

What Development Teams Can Learn From Experience Designers

1 min read

I'm speaking at Philadelphia's Emerging Technologies in the Enterprise conference on April 22, 2014 -- Philadelphia's "Day of the Developer"! In this talk, I share what I've learned from the Experience Designers at Think Brownstone for the technical audience that's interested in making things awesome. (abstract, slides)