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Kimberly Blessing

Craftmanship can change the world

2 min read

Most mornings, I hit the Starbucks near work for a double tall non-fat no-whip cinnamon dolce latte. Yes, it's a mouthful to say. And apparently it's a really tough drink to get right... at least for the morning crew at this particular Starbucks. Despite seeing the same crew regularly, I almost always have to correct them on some aspect of my drink that they've screwed up (espresso shots sat too long, wrong milk, wrong size drink, scorched milk, etc.). When I do point something out, rather than get an apology, I'm usually given some excuse as to why it's not right. I'm starting to suspect that either they're making my drink wrong on purpose or they just don't care about their craft -- but in either case, they send a clear signal: a job's a job, and they don't care about theirs all that much.

Web developers can't have this attitude. We absolutely must care about our craft and continually ensure that our work is demonstrative of best practices (both industry and our own signature practices). Sloppy execution of our work leads to cross-browser problems, inaccessible features, confusing user interactions, and time lost refactoring code in the future. We don't get to give excuses to our customers -- if it doesn't work, end users don't use the site, and clients don't pay. Messy code shows that we don't care about leaving something our fellow developers can learn from, and it demonstrates that we don't care to take the time get our code right.

I shudder to think about the kind of code the baristas at the local Starbucks would write, were they developers. If only they could be more like so many of the awesome developers/craftspeople I know... then I'd be happily caffeinated each morning. And if fewer developers wrote code the way those baristas make drinks? Well, the Web might just explode from all that awesomeness.